My Take on the Attention Economy

So, now I can make posts by means of e-mail. This is very convenient, since this allows to convert my Obsidian notes into blog posts with minimal editing.

It is very convenient, because it basically removes the need to open a web browser to broadcast my ideas. Which, in turn, reduces the number of times I open some web sites because of habit, not because of need.

This, in turn, allows further economy of attention, since I need it for my projects and ideas, and not for anyone else’s.

The next step would be to finalise the monitoring of the news by means of combining the RSS subscriptions and the e-mail ones: once my system gets a message, it should me marked read and put to a folder, so then I can either skim through the list at will, or search for certain topics whenever I see fit.

This may look rather old-fashioned to some of my readers, but in the long run, attention is the resource I need for myself, and I am rather tired of it being depleted by the various players on the attention economy market.

The next stage, however, will be the most difficult: I will have to establish a schedule of communication with the real people around me, so I keep them posted on myself, keep myself posted on them, and all that without bullshit small talk or other pseudo-social bullshitry.

I think I shall share the exact methods and results upon completing and testing the system.


Moving Forward Despite the Problems (and some Plans)

I have finally managed to put an end to manual note-writing due to its non-connectedness, slowness and problems with comprehension. This was quite a difficult process because I have got very used to jotting notes by hand since 2010.

So, it is time to double down on my research and optimise multiple other practices so to catch up with the time lost in depression, speaking of which…

Life in Russia seems to have much to do with my depression: this feeling of helplessness against the violent idiocy of the Russian life, where almost no one is allowed to act on one's own accord, and must comply to the party line.

From my handwritten diaries.

So, by the 1st September, 2023 I am going to leave Russia for good. So to achieve that, I need to:

  • Sell the belongings that can be sold;
  • Make sure I leave nothing of importance behind;
  • Find a university to enter to finish my Bachelor's degree.

Hopefully, I leave Russia before the crackdown on the Internet takes place.


Done with LiDA

I have finally read through the Learning in the Digital Age course. It content was interesting enough to give me a lot of ideas, but not important enough to spend time on preparing for the exam and getting a certificate.

However, yet another ‘tail’ from the bloody 2022 is cut.


The Map of the Personalised Learning Environment

I think that developing ‘digital literacies’ is a rather late to me: I am more in need of extending them beyond the customary and well-known sphere of my daily practices.

This is how it is: I feel rather antiquated.

For me, digital literacy is an instance of application of the critical thinking practices to the Internet environment and the tools available in it. Whilst the instrumental part of this instance is rather unique, the methodological one is common to any process of critical perception of media. During the LiDA100 course, I found a few new instruments useful for navigating the Internet, indeed. However, the further development of my digital literacies cannot be planned easily, since I need to focus on the methodological issues instead of dealing with specific software or resources. After all, finding information is not a problem for me at all – the problem is putting it into context and order.


Getting started with Personalised Learning Environments

I decided to pick up a course on Learning in Digital Age, because I have already intuitively approached many of the topics covered by it:

  1. RSS subscriptions
  2. Personal Knowledge Bases (PKBs)
  3. Personal Wikis etc.

However, I feel that there is more to the craft that I stumbled into by chance.
What I really like about this course is the accent at the Open Source technologies and sources: I firmly believe that in the XXI century, there is no way of doing science the old way.
All the borders must be ignored, all the institutional limitation must be abolished, and a work of science should be considered as non-existent in case it is not available to a broad audience for free or – even better – under a permissive or libre licence.
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